How Are You Helping Kids Learn About MediaLit & Fake News? Progress?

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Check out Google’s new fact check feature.

Teachers all over the country are sharing ideas about how to help their students identify news that is made-up, unsubstantiated, or just plain false. Now Google has added a feature that identifies false information that comes up on user searches. An April 7, 2017 article at the Pointer Journalism site describes Google’s new fact check in detail and explains how the company went about developing its new feature. You can also read the CNET article about Google.

I’ve been delighted by the articles, such as Five Ways Teachers Are Fighting Fake News, an NPR education article that describe how three teachers are incorporating media literacy activities into their curriculum.  Plenty of other similar reports have appeared in various the media. I hope that, somewhere, there is an organization that is archiving as many teacher ideas as possible.                          Continue reading

Your News, My News – Do We Get the Same Views?

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-10-24-28-amAccording to a video shared by the DuckDuckGo website, when we  search for information on Google each of us can get slightly different, or sometimes enormously different results – even if we use the exact search terms in the exact order and at about the same time. DuckDuckGo, a search engine that emphasizes privacy, is a Google competitor.

The order of Google’s results may guided by what it knows about the individual who is doing the search. (Check out Ghostery to identify trackers on any or all of your pages.)

Collected information – including any previous searches, where we live, what we read, where we get our news, what we purchase, how much we travel, and much more can affect what we see in the results. I never thought about this much, but I do remember how a few years ago a group of my middle school students were searching on Google for information, and I noticed and was puzzled that similar searches sometimes generated lists of slightly different results. Continue reading

When It Comes to Check Writing “The Times Are A’ changin”

With thanks to the Deviant Art blog,  http://theinfamousj.deviantart.com

With thanks to the Deviant Art blog, http://theinfamousj.deviantart.com

People of a certain age write checks. People of a much younger certain age, mainly millennials don’t, instead using their mobile phones for most of their financial transactions.

It would be hard to find an elder who cannot write a check, and most aging children still write them, albeit far less frequently. Some parents have given a check to their millennial young adult, only to have their child carry it around in a wallet for weeks and weeks rather than cashing it.

Now according to Washington Post Wonkblog writer, Christopher Ingraham, how to write a check is a big search item on Google.            Continue reading

Has Your Child Grown Up With Google? Check Out This Article

Ever so often adults are reminded that the world where we grew up is dramatically different from the world where our 21st Century children live, learn, and grow. What is new and different for parents and educators is merely routine to digital kids.

Over at the TeachThought blog I discovered an interesting article about the dramatic life changes that have occurred during the first 16 years of Google’s existence (dramatic to adults, that is). The author uses Google as a yardstick to measure the ways the world has changed during those 16 years, Click on the box below to read the whole article.

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Continue reading

So What Else Can Google Do?

Made with Tagul!

Made with Tagul!

Did you know that, besides searching, Google can carry out a variety of simple tasks in daily life — making 21st Century connected life easier or at least a bit quicker? Amaze your children or students by trying out and sharing a few of these Google bells and whistles. A few of the tasks may also support learning activities.

  1. Use Google as a timer by typing set time to 24 minutes.
  2. Find a movie release by typing the name of the movie and the word release: e.g., Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel release.
  3. Check out the sunrise and sunset times by typing sunrise in [town or city].
  4. Get the weather forecast by typing forecast [town or city].
  5. Get a definition by typing define [word here].
  6. Figure out a tip by typing tip calculator.
  7. Get songs by groups you like by typing songs by the [group name].
  8. Convert measurements by typing convert and the units that you want to convert to: e.g., convert 3 yards to meters.
  9. Find books by a certain author by typing books by [author’s name].
  10. Get a definition by typing define [word here].

Check out even more!      Continue reading

Google Dashboard: A Connected-World Teaching Tool for All Ages

A screen show from the Google Dashboard.

A screen shot from the Google Dashboard.

If you use Google, take a few minutes to check out the Google Dashboard and look over a detailed digital footprint snapshot of your Google activities. Learning about digital footprints is an important 21st Century connected-world skill.

The Dashboard keeps track of everything — and I mean everything — that you do on Google. It’s a dynamic digital footprint collection. To sign in and examine your Gmail or Google Alerts is easy, and you can also check out the other features offered by Google such as Google Docs, Google Calendar, Blogger, or Google Reader (many more Google products are available and new ones become available on a regular basis).

Google Dashboard is an awesome connected-world teaching tool for 21st Century children at any age and for adults, because it makes a point — concretely — about the amount of information that Google accumulates on each of us. Many people are surprised, and a bit disconcerted, on a first visit, because the Dashboard depicts a good deal about each user.

Continue reading

Google+ vs. Facebook

Google Facebook privacy

This clip is from the info graphic.

Please check out my post comparing Facebook and Google+  over at Discover Your Child’s Digital World another blog that I maintain.

My content addresses issues of interest for parents whose kids use either or both of the sites and focuses on interesting facts, some of the differences between Google+ and Facebook, and privacy issues.

I  illustrate with a terrific infographic from Veracode Application Security.