Posted in cyber-bullying, digital citizenship, digital parenting, parents and technology, social media

Summary of White House Bullying Prevention Summit

Over at Net Family News, Ann Collier has provided a superb summary of the Bullying Prevention Summit held last Thursday at the White House. Her blog post, Takeaways from the Bullying Prevention Summit, includes a list of presenters, links to organizations that are working on national plans to deal with cyberbullying, and a list of federal government initiatives.

Early in January 2011 this blog published a short post, Bullying and Cyberbullying: Myths and Reality, describing an Washington Post article, Five Myths About Bullying by one of the summit presenters, Susan Swearer-Napolitano. Swearer, a professor at the University of Nebraska, co-authored the book, Bullying Prevention and Intervention (under the name Susan M. Swearer).

Other Articles About the Bullying Prevention Summit

Posted in digital parenting, good books to read, parent education, parents and technology

Bullying and Cyber-bullying: Myths and Reality

Read Five Myths About Bullying in the December 30, 2010 Washington Post. While the media focuses on the high-profile cases of bullying and cyber-bullying, the author of this article, Susan M. Swearer, a co-author of Bullying Prevention and Intervention: Realistic Strategies for Schools, writes that the relentless coverage may distract schools and parents from more traditional types of bullying. While technology has made bullying worse, a significant  number of students are bullied without the use of technology.  The author points out that:

While it’s hard to stereotype bullying behavior in every school in every town in America, experts agree that at least 25 percent of students across the nation are bullied in traditional ways: hit, shoved, kicked, gossiped about, intimidated or excluded from social groups.

The article mentions and links to several programs that have been successful at reducing bullying behavior. Swearer, who is an associate professor of school psychology at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, points out that, “…when awareness of bullying becomes as much a part of school culture as reverence for athletics or glee club, we’ll have a shot at finally stopping it.”