Posted in 21st Century Learning, digital learning, digital parenting, electronic reading, i-Books and e-Books, iPhones and iPads, resources to read

My Roundup of e-Books and e-Self-Publishing

KQED MediaShift posted a March 15, 2012 list of recently published articles on e-books and self-publishing. On this page you can also sign up for a regular self-publishing e-newsletter from MediaShift.

A Few More Self-publishing Resources From that I’ve Read Over the Past Few Months

Posted in digital parenting, digital world reading habits, electronic reading, parents and technology

Kids and Reading: Widening Digital Opportunities

Check out the app!

Recently NPR reporter, Lynn Neary, broadcast a report, Children’s Book Apps: A New World of Learning.  You can also listen to the story.

In her March 28, 2011 radio report, Neary describes the increasing number of children’s books that are available as apps, useable on smartphones and especially on iPads. These applications make reading children’s books into a multimedia experience.

Some added features of these digital books include:

  • Words that highlight as the story is read.
  • Object words that are spelled when a child taps an image.
  • Activities that relate to the story.

While many parents and teachers love these apps, some experts believe that the reading process is dramatically changed by the addition of other features.  One expert, a professor at Kansas State University, suggests that we need a new word to describe the enhanced reading that takes place in the app storybook environment, but he is hesitant to label these interactions as pure reading. Continue reading “Kids and Reading: Widening Digital Opportunities”

Posted in digital parenting, digital world reading habits, electronic reading, parents and technology, technology changes

Print Books or E-Books? What Do You Think?

What’s better — a real book that a person holds and cuddles, rereads or loans to a friend, or an i-book/e-book that is digital, portable, and much easier to lug around?  I’m often asked to take one side or another, but I think that different books are useful in different situations. Moreover, e-books provide well-written and absorbing digital reading experiences that counterbalance the typically truncated prose that kids find on most websites. The goal of every parent and teacher is to help a child love to read, so whether a child gravitates to one type of book or the other doesn’t really matter.

This week I read a great article in one of my magazines (the old-fashioned kind and my favorite), Multimedia & Internet @ Schools. Written by Stephen Abram, PBooks vs. EBooks: Are there Educational Issues? goes into some detail comparing and contrasting the two types of reading media. The magazine’s website makes some articles available for free, but sadly this isn’t one of them. Check back to see if it become free to view because the article is worth reading in its entirety.

Check out the table below to read more of the comparisons from Stephen Abram’s article..

Continue reading “Print Books or E-Books? What Do You Think?”